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Jose Canseco Biography

Full nameJose Canseco y Capas Jr.
Know asJose Canseco, Canseco, Jose
Birth placeHavana, Cuba
Birth date1964-07-02
Age53 years, 6 month, 10 days
Star signCancer
Height6' 3½" (1.92 m)

Jose Canseco y Capas Jr. sources

IMDBimdb.com/name/nm1154820
Wikipediawikipedia.org/wiki?curid=175552

Jose Canseco y Capas Jr. Biography:

Cuban-born Jose Canseco immigrated along with his family to America as a kid in 1965. He made his name as among Major League Baseball’s star batters together with the Oakland Athletics in the mid- to late 1980s. After retiring from baseball in 2001, Canseco reentered the limelight with a tell-all book showing his longtime steroid use, and that of other star baseball players.

Just one year old at that time, Canseco and his family boarded a modest propeller plane to start a fresh life in America. “We’d nothing,” Canseco’s dad remembered.

Capitalizing on his English skills and previous experience as a supervisor for an oil company, Canseco’s driven dad shortly landed jobs as a territory manager for Amoco Oil as well as a part time security guard, enabling him to give a secure American life because of his family. Canseco Sr. was also an enthusiastic baseball enthusiast, and he soon set out to instruct his sons to play the game he loved. Yet, much to his dad’s chagrin, as a son Canseco was an average baseball player. “You are likely to grow up and work at Burger King or McDonald’s,” the slugger after remembered his dad yelling at him when he neglected to shine on the baseball diamond. “You will never add up to anything.”

Canseco attended Coral Park High School in Miami, where he continued to fight with baseball. Although he sometimes showed flashes of a extraordinary natural ability in the plate, Canseco was painfully inconsistent, neglecting to produce the varsity squad through the initial three of his four years in high school. Eventually he loved a true breakout season, showing fearsome power in the plate, and was again named team MVP.

The A’s sent him to play because of their Premier League team in Idaho Falls, Idaho, where Canseco brought in $600 a month on his first minor league contract. “Seven or eight of us all lived together in a location which was virtually condemned; it was such a dump,” Canseco afterwards recalled. “It’d no heater, no nothing, and in the event you wished to make use of the toilet, you’ll need to hold back until you went to the ballpark.”

While he was fighting adapting to life in the minor league, Canseco’s body started to experience a remarkable change. As an 18-year old in 1982, Canseco was so scrawny that one opposing pitcher joked he could hula hoop with a Cheerio. From the time he made his Major League debut three years after, Canseco had transformed right into a hulking giant with all the physique of a bodybuilder. Although in the time he credited the change to an intensive workout regimen, he’s since acknowledged that those years marked the start of his steroid use.

Canseco made his debut together with the Oakland Athletics at the center of the 1985 season and was immediately discovered success in the Major League level, batting an impressive .302 in his rookie season.

In 1992, the A’s traded Canseco to the Texas Rangers, where he spent three years putting up productive amounts without ever actually matching the dominant play he’d shown in Oakland. In 1995, Canseco moved to the Boston Red Sox, where he played two largely unremarkable seasons. After returning to the Athletics to get a single-season cameo in 1997, Canseco played most of the following three years together with the Toronto Blue Jays (1998-2000). He had a short stint together with the New York Yankees at the start of the 2000 season. Late-career highlights contained a astonishing 46-home run season with all the Blue Jays in 1998 a second World Series tournament, won with Toronto in 2000.

Canseco completed his illustrious baseball career with 462 home runs, six all star choices, one American League MVP award and two World Series tournaments.

But Canseco’s biggest impact on the sport of baseball could have come after his retirement. In 2005, he wrote Juiced, a tell-all book showing his own longtime steroid use and maintaining that misuse of performance-enhancing drugs was nearly omnipresent among baseball’s top stars. Enormous stars Canseco outed as steroid users comprised Mark McGwire, Rafael Palmeiro and Jason Giambi.

“The challenge isn’t to uncover a top player that has used steroids,” he wrote in his novel. “The challenge will be to uncover a top player who has not.” The claims included in Canseco’s book helped start the 2007 Mitchell Report, the culmination of a 21-month investigation into steroid use in Major League Baseball headed by Senator George Mitchell.

In 2008, Canseco wrote another novel, Vindicated, which further elaborated on the area of steroids in baseball and accused cleancut New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez of using the drugs. Rodriguez finally admitted to juicing before in his career, though he insisted he’d quit using steroids years before.

In 1988, Canseco wed Esther Haddad, and they stayed married for 3 years until divorcing in 1991. Then he married a Hooters waitress named Jessica Sekely in 1996, however they too divorced in 2000. Both of Canseco’s ex wives mentioned episodes of domestic violence as the reason for divorce.

After observed as one among the most famous stars in Major League Baseball, Canseco’s name has since become almost interchangeable using the game’s “steroids age.” While some revile Canseco for steroids exploitation and after that ratting out former friends and teammates, others respect him for being courageous enough to blow the lid off Major League Baseball’s wild issue with performance-enhancing drugs. Canseco himself expresses little sorrow for his options, either in days gone by or in the present. “I wished to be the best baseball player on the planet,” he said. “That was my aim, my only aim, really, and that I never let matters stand in the manner of my targets. So because sense, no, I am not embarrassed of it.

Jose Canseco Biography