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Wilma Rudolph Biography

Full nameWilma Glodean Rudolph
Know asWilma Rudolph, Wilma Glodean Rudolph, Rudolph, Wilma
Birth placeSaint Bethlehem, Tennessee, United States
Birth date1940-06-23
Died1994-11-12
Lived54 years, 4 month, 19 days
Star signCancer
Height1.52
Weight58.97

Wilma Glodean Rudolph sources

IMDBimdb.com/name/nm1356385
Wikipediawikipedia.org/wiki?curid=34095

Wilma Glodean Rudolph Biography:

She beat her handicaps through physical therapy and hard work, and went to develop into a talented runner. Rudolph became the very first American woman to win three gold medals in one Olympics in 1960, in the Summer Games in Rome, and afterwards worked as a teacher and track coach. She died in Tennessee in 1994.

However, the road to success had not been a simple one for Wilma Rudolph. Stricken with polio as a young child, she had issues with her left leg and needed to put on a brace. It was with great determination as well as the help of physical therapy that she could beat the illness along with her resulting physical impairments. My doctors told me I could not walk again. My mom said I ‘d. I believed my mom. A naturally talented runner, she was soon recruited to train with Tennessee State University track coach Ed Temple.

While still in high school, Wilma Rudolph, nicknamed “Skeeter” for her well-known rate, qualified for the 1956 Summer Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia. The youngest person in the U.S. team at the age of 16, she won a bronze medal in the sprint relay race event. After finishing high school, Rudolph registered at Tennessee State University, where she studied instruction. She additionally prepared hard for another Olympics.

Most notably, Rudolph became the very first American woman to win three gold medals in one Olympic Games. The first class sprinter immediately became among the most famous sportsmen of the Rome Games at the same time as a global star, lauded around the planet for her groundbreaking accomplishments. She retired from competition not long after, being a teacher as well as a track trainer, but her achievements on the Olympic track stayed her best known: Throughout the ’60s, Rudolph was broadly regarded as the world’s fastest girl.

Rudolph shared her extraordinary story with all the world in 1977 with her autobiography, Wilma. Her novel was later turned into a TV film. In the 1980s, she was inducted to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame and created the Wilma Rudolph Foundation to promote recreational sports. Wilma Rudolph expired on November 12, 1994, near Nashville, Tennessee, losing a fight with brain cancer.

Rudolph is recalled as among the quickest girls in track so when a source of great inspiration for generations of African American sportsmen. She once said, “Winning is great, sure, but if you’re actually planning to make a move in life, the secret is learning the best way to lose. Nobody goes undefeated on a regular basis. If you’re able to get following a devastating defeat, and go to win again, you’re likely to be a champion someday.” In 2004, the United States Postal Service honored the Olympic winner by featuring her likeness on a 23-cent postage.

Wilma Rudolph Biography