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William Seward Biography

William Henry Seward was born on May 16, 1801, in Florida, Ny. He served as a Ny senator from 1830 to 1834, New York governor from 1839 to 1842, and a U.S. senator from 1849 to 1861. He went to serve as the country’s secretary of state from 1861 to 1869, under Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson. In 1867, Seward formed the purchase of the Alaska territory. He was an active abolitionist throughout his life, and supported Harriet Tubman in the purchase of property in his hometown of Auburn, Ny, where he expired on October 10, 1872. William Henry Seward was born on May 16, 1801, in Florida, Ny. Mary Jennings was of Irish ancestry, and could have become the source for her son’s thicket of wild red hair.

A zealous student, Seward was sent to Farmers’ Hall Academy after which Union College when he was 15, although he ran away to Georgia to get a short stint before graduating. His time teaching in the South, although a nice recreation, encouraged Seward’s growing antislavery opinions that had started in a young age, when he became buddies along with his family’s several slaves.

Seward studied law in private after graduation, so when paying a call to Frances Miller a young woman he’d met through his sister, Cornelia he was lucky to discover that her daddy, Judge Elijah Miller, was seeking a junior partner. Seward and Frances were married on October 20, 1824, and then, moved into the Miller family house in Auburn, Ny. Both Seward and his new wife were devoted to the abolition of slavery, along with some other sorts of social reform that were contentious at that time. He earned a period in the New York Senate in 1830, and went on to served as governor of New York for two periods, from 1839 to 1842.

Although Seward earned himself political opponents by first calling the clash using the South “irrepressible” and then advocating prudence, after the Civil War started he was unwavering in the aim to maintain the Union. Also, his foreign policy isolating the Confederacy from foreign allies was and continues to be highly commended. An effort was made on Seward’s life via an ally of John Wilkes Booth the same night as Lincoln’s assassination.

There’s evidence they were involved in the Underground Railroad, and given financial backing to Frederick Douglass’s North Star newspaper in Rochester, Ny. Seward supported Harriet Tubman in the purchase of property in his hometown of Auburn, Ny, where he expired on October 10, 1872.

Seward’s disshevelled appearance and ever present cigar may conjure Columbo, but the intelligent and able statesman’s heritage is one among achievement and vision. His latest biographer, Walter Stahr, writer of Seward: Lincoln’s Essential Man, claims that Seward is considered an model secretary of state, second only to John Quincy Adams. William Seward is considered the first New Yorker honored using a monument in the city: A statue of Seward by Randolph Rogers, situated in Madison Square Park in Nyc, was dedicated in 1876.

William Seward Biography