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Montgomery Clift Biography

Full nameEdward Montgomery Clift
Know asMontgomery Clift, Clift, Montgomery
Birth placeOmaha, Nebraska, U.S.
Birth date1920-10-17
Died1966-07-23
Lived45 years, 9 month, 6 days
Star signLibra
OccupationActor
Height5' 10" (1.78 m)

Edward Montgomery Clift sources

IMDBimdb.com/name/nm0001050
Wikipediawikipedia.org/wiki?curid=149813

Edward Montgomery Clift Biography:

Among Hollywood’s first Strategy performers, he made his movie debut in Howard Hawks’ 1948 western, Red River. A near-fatal auto accident in 1957 altered his appearances and sent him into drug and alcohol dependency. Clift died in 1966. While his dad was away on work, that was frequently, Ethel directed her family on jaunts to Europe or Bermuda, where the Clifts had a second house. In the aftermath of the 1929 stock market crash, but the family’s circumstances significantly transformed. The Clifts, which contained Monty’s twin sister, Roberta, as well as a brother, Brooks, settled right into a fresh, more humble life in Sarasota, Florida.

In the age of 13, Clift began playing having an area theater company. His mom was impressed by her son’s devotion to the stage and supported him to pursue his craft. When the family moved again, this time to Nyc, Clift earned another Broadway nod as the lead in Dame Nature. The part cemented Clift, only 17 years old, as a Broadway star. During the following ten years, he appeared in other productions, including There Shall Not Be Any Night, The Skin of Our Teeth as well as Our Town, amongst others.

For years Clift had resisted calls to leap to the big screen. He was special about his work and his directors. He eventually made the jump together with the 1948 launch Red River, a Howard Hawks–directed western co starring John Wayne. The exact same year crowds were treated to another Clift movie, The Search, which starred the performer as an American G.I. in postwar Germany. The movie catapulted Clift to full fledged Hollywood star standing and earned him an Academy nomination for Best Actor.

For Hollywood, Clift signified an entirely different sort of leading man. He was sensitive and exposed, and unafraid in the characters he taken, even though they cast him as a villain. While the movie world observed his heartthrob status—gossip columnists always linked Clift with Taylor, a close pal—Clift and those around him concealed the fact that he was homosexual.

In May 1957 disaster hit when Clift, driving home from a celebration at Taylor’s California house, veered off the trail and hit a telephone pole. The injury devastated Clift, physically and mentally. He’d already been coping with alcohol and prescription drug issues, and his habits soared. Within the following ten years, Clift continued to work, appearing in seven more pictures. His closing role came in The Defector (1966), where he played an American physicist working with a CIA representative in Germany to ensure the defection of a Russian scientist. Clift died of a heart attack at his house in Nyc on July 23, 1966.

Montgomery Clift Biography