Home / Celebrities / Molly Pitcher Biography

Molly Pitcher Biography

Full namePetra Dobbertin

Petra Dobbertin sources

IMDBimdb.com/name/nm0229591

Petra Dobbertin Biography:

Throughout the American Revolutionary War’s Battle of Monmouth, she carried pitchers of water to soldiers, thus earning her nickname. After her husband fell during the conflict, she took on the operation of his cannon. Honored in 1822 for her bravery, she expired in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, on January 22, 1832.

Mary Ludwig, who go down ever as Molly Pitcher, was born circa October 13, 1754, near Trenton, New Jersey. In 1768, she moved to Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where she met William (also called John) Hays, an area barber. They wed on July 24, 1769. As it was common in the time for wives to be near their husbands in conflict and aid as needed, Pitcher followed Hays back to New Jersey through the war’s Philadelphia Campaign (1777-78).

His wife was present at the same time, and she made innumerable excursions into a closeby spring to fill pitchers of cold water for soldiers to drink also to pour above their cannons to cool them down. However, the legend just started with her new name. Based on reports, Pitcher seen her husband fall at his cannon, not able to continue together with the battle. She promptly dropped her water pitcher and took his spot in the cannon, manning the weapon through the rest of the conflict before the Colonists attained success.

She found that it was fortunate it didn’t pass somewhat higher… and continued her profession.” With her activities on this day, Molly Pitcher became among the most famous and enduring symbols of the girls who led to the American Revolution.

Pitcher continued using the Continental Army before the war stopped, then moved back to Carlisle with Hays in April 1783. Following her husband’s departure, she wed a war veteran named John McCauley and worked in the State House in Carlisle. She was honored by the Pennsylvania Legislature in 1822 for her wartime services, receiving an award of $40 and a yearly commission of the exact same sum for the remainder of her life. She expired on January 22, 1832, in Carlisle, in which a monument commemorates her desperate actions in conflict.

Molly Pitcher Biography